Violet vs Purple

Mid September 2018 – Today  I learned more about purple and violet. How color hits our eyes and we create the picture based on color
wavelengths sent to our eye. I like learning things, and in particular I like violet better then purple for a number of reasons. Here is what you should know about these colors.

The individual difference between ‘violet’ and ‘purple’

People say that a picture is worth a thousand words, so let’s take a look at the two colors in comparison (there are various shades of purple and violet, and the following picture shows some of the more common ones):

So, purple is more reddish and saturated, while violet is more bluish and less saturated. Case closed, right?

There is more in it than the eyes can see (quite literally). To understand the difference, we have to take a look at how our eyes work first.

The electromagnetic spectrum is a continuous range of wavelengths, only a tiny part of which is visible to humans:

Electromagnetic Spectrum

We see neither the ultraviolet wavelengths and shorter, nor the infrared wavelengths and longer. How do we see the rest? We have three types of color-sensitive cells in our eyes, so-called cones.

The cones don’t perceive just a single wavelength; they are activated by a whole range of wavelengths, and the signals received from the cones are then processed by the brain in such a way that every color can be thought of as composed of three different elementary signals.

The following picture shows approximately how the brain perceives different spectral colors (the higher the curve, the higher the intensity of the elementary signal the brain receives):

Color-Cones

For example, when you see monochromatic (pure) red light on the very right side of the spectrum, only the “red” signal path is activated, which tells your brain to create the impression of red. On the other hand, when you see pure green light (in the middle), both “green” and “red” paths are activated, but your brain knows that “a lot of green activation and a bit less red activation” is in fact just a pure green color, which is what you see.

When a mixture of photons that have different wavelengths hits the retina (creating a ratio of red, green, and blue activation different from any spectral color), the brain will perceive it as an entirely different color. For example, there is no white wavelength. What we perceive as “white” is in fact just a mixture of many different spectral colors.

What happens when violet light hits the retina?

The “red” signal path has an interesting additional property. As you can see above, it has a small bump of activation around the short-wavelength (violet) end of the visible spectrum. When violet light hits the retina, both the “blue” path and (much less) the “red” path are activated. The brain interprets this kind of input in a specific way, which we call “violet”.

It is worth noting that the pigment in the “green” cones themselves also has a small peak of absorption around violet wavelengths, but the brain seems to ignore it (it is not possible to simulate the perception of violet by a combination of green and blue light).

Purple is not a spectral color

As we noted before, many colors we can see are not in the visible spectrum. When you see an object, typically a mixture of different wavelengths reaches your retina, which causes the cones to be activated at a ratio not achievable by a spectral color.

Our brains are very good at interpreting this mixture (it would be silly to simply throw away a part of the incoming information and make everything look like the closest spectral color), and, as a result, we are able to see several million different colors, most of which are not present in the spectrum.

As we noted at the beginning of the article, purple looks more “reddish” than violet, and that’s absolutely correct. Purple is formed by mixing red and blue at a ratio close to 1:1, whereas violet is perceived by your eyes as containing more blue than red.

Purple and violet look similar only to humans

To us, humans, purple looks like a more saturated shade of violet, but violet objects in nature are fundamentally different from purple ones. Purple objects are “red and blue at the same time”, whereas violet objects are… just violet.

If you take a look at the distance between violet and blue in the picture of the spectrum above, it is about the same as the distance between green and orange. Purple is a mixture of red (which is at the opposite side of the spectrum than violet) and blue (which is relatively far from violet), so it is, in terms of wavelengths, a completely different color.

The reason why purple and violet look similar to us is because they stimulate our cones in a similar way, but most other animals don’t share the same types of cones and “post-processing”. This means that to other animals, purple and violet may look completely different!

Now imagine a violet flower petal with a purple pattern on it. Depending on the particular shades, this pattern might be completely invisible to us, while many other animals could see it as clearly as we can see an orange pattern on green background. Even common consumer cameras wouldn’t help us; they are designed to capture the same red-green-blue information as our eyes do, so even taking a photo of the petal and editing it in Photoshop would not uncover the pattern.

Look for aura that is “deep pink and dark green” for the cosmic teacher.

SOURCE LINK TO CONTENT FROM   –  Jakub Marian

Fawn M Brodie

This post is dedicated to Fawn M. Brodie

Born – September 15, 1915 – Died –  January 10, 1981

She would have turned 103 years old – if any of you like to read and want a good book – I mean, a book where YOU REALLY get into it – Please pick up one of hers!

Here is a quote Fawn:

She has written some incredible books. IN FACT – I really enjoy her writing style. Very brilliant. I wish I could have met her.

Fawn Brodie’s father was LDS Prophet David O. McKay’s brother. She was known nationally for her historical works on Thomas Jefferson and Richard Nixon, but among the Mormons was best known as author of “No Man Knows My History”, a biography of Joseph Smith, Jr.

This interview is adapted from an audio taped interview by California State University – I posted a sample of this HERE =

Q: What was your mother’s reaction to your disbelief in Joseph Smith’s divine calling as a prophet?

A: Mother was a kind of quiet heretic which made it much easier for me. Her father had been nominally devout but as president of the Brigham Young University he had brought in people like G. Stanley Hall and John Dewey as lecturers, and philosophers and psychologists who were fascinated by the Mormon scene. He was a very open minded man and a fine educator. Some of this rubbed off on my mother and so I say, “My grandfather was not a heretic, but his children were,” or rather some of them were.

Q: What about your brother and sisters?

A: Well, my brother is still a devout Mormon but my sisters are all, what we call, “Jack Mormons,” since they are still technically in the church but they are not active and they don’t go along with the Mormon dogma. They still count themselves Mormons.

Q: Do you?

A: Oh, no. I am an excommunicated Mormon. I was officially excommunicated when the biography of Joseph Smith was written and published. About six months after publication, there was a formal excommunication.

Q: Would you care to explain more about that?

A: I was excommunicated for heresy–and I was a heretic– and specifically for writing the book. My husband was teaching at Yale at the time and we were living in New Haven, CT. Two Mormon missionaries came to the door and presented me with a letter asking me to appear before the bishop’s court in Cambridge, MA to defend myself against heresy. I simply told them, or wrote a letter telling them, that I would not go because, after all, I was a heretic. So then I was officially excommunicated and got a letter to that effect.

Q: This was because of writing the book “No Man Knows My History?”

A: That is right.

Q: Were you allowed ample access to records and manuscripts when you were writing the book?

A: Almost all of the material in the book came from three great libraries. At the University of Chicago, where I was working after I married Bernard, there was really a great collection of western New York State history so by going through the material I was able to find out something about the sources of Joseph Smith’s ideas, particularly the ideas which went into the writing of the Book of Mormon. I finally ended up going to Albany, NY, where all the newspapers were kept which were published in Joseph Smith’s own hometown in Palmyra, NY. So I was able to read the newspapers he had read as a young man. This turned out to be an absolute gold mine!

A lot of the theories about the American Indians being descendants of the Lost Ten Tribes and the descriptions of what were being found in the Indian mounds were in the newspapers. The speculation was there. That was extremely important as was the anti-Masonic material. The anti-Masonic excitement was very strong at that time. Then I went to the Library of Congress and the New York Public Library. The New York Public Library has the best Mormon collection in the country outside of Salt Lake City, Utah.

I did go to the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at Independence, MO, and I did go to the library of Salt Lake City for some periodicals, early Mormon periodicals that I couldn’t get anywhere else. I was permitted to see those, but I was not permitted to see any manuscript material.

Q: Are those church archives open now? I read a comment indicating that it was believed that your book would open archival material.

A: It had the reverse effect. The archives were largely closed to scholars after my book came out. But in recent years they have become open again. The new man who is head of the church historian’s office, Leonard Arrington, a fine historian, is much more liberal in his attitude than the older historians. The younger scholars are now being given access to the archives in a way they were not before. I think this was long overdue but a very good trend.

PLEASE READ THE ENTIRE INTERVIEW HERE (SOURCE)

Today is 9/12/2018 – a few days before her birthday. I enjoyed her books so much, I want you all to look at her work – her pictures – and know this women was beautiful !

In God We Trust – USA Forever – Do  something nice for someone today !!