Category Archives: Science

Animal Intuition

All Dogs Are Different

LOL I think these dogs knew it was a stuffed animal.

Animals are very intelligent, they just need love and training. Both are needed in order to prosper. But they also have some internal skills.

Definition of intuition

1a : the power or faculty of attaining to direct knowledge or cognition without evident rational thought and inference

b : immediate apprehension or cognition c : knowledge or conviction gained by intuition

Dogs: Super-Savvy, Socially

Although every dog is unique, there is enough evidence to indicate that species-wide one of the really special things about dogs is how well they understand humans. “They are very attentive to and responsive to us, which is a great social cognitive skill,” Dr. Alexandra Horowitz, head of the Dog Cognition Lab at Barnard College, Columbia University, told me.

Researchers don’t entirely agree on why dogs are so socially savvy. The prevailing view is that their social intelligence is evolutionary: that over the thousands of years since wolves entered the human sphere and started to morph into the pets we know today, breeding has favored qualities that make dogs good companions to humans, such as friendliness and an affinity for us, which make them good at reading our behavior.

There’s also a theory that each dog simply acquires his or her social intelligence through the sheer amount of time spent around humans – that’s why puppy socialization is so important.

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The Venus Project

This video is truly awe inspiring.

This man Jacques Fresco had an interview 10 years ago in 2004 and you can see what a genius really looks like.

He talks about the 1920’s depression, our monetary values, and the vast waste of the earth’s resources. We are moving to total 100% automation, driven by greed.

What is the cost to humanity, and our environment?

“We cannot solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them”
– Albert Einstein

Spring Forward: Why Do We Change Our Clocks?

Spring forward in March! Greetings to all of you!  Tonight don’t forget to change clocks and put some new batteries in those smoke alarms. We hope you have a wonderful prosperous month!

The beginning of Daylight Saving Time is a great reminder to change the batteries in your smoke detectors, too.

World on Time

Most of the United States, including New Orleans, will lose an hour at 2 a.m. Sunday by moving forward into Daylight Saving Time.

So, why the heck do we observe Daylight Saving Time? The simple answer… it is to save on energy costs!

One of the biggest reasons we change our clocks to Daylight Saving Time (DST) is that it reportedly saves electricity.

Recently, newer studies, are challenging long-held reason.

In general, energy use and the demand for electricity for lighting our homes is directly connected to when we go to bed and when we get up. Bedtime for most of us is late evening through the year. When we go to bed, we turn off the lights and TV.

In the average home, 25% of all the electricity we use is for lighting and small appliances, such as TVs, VCRs and stereos. A good percentage of energy consumed by lighting and appliances occurs in the evening when families are home. By moving the clock ahead one hour, we can cut the amount of electricity we consume each day.

Studies done in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Transportation show that we trim the entire country’s electricity usage by about 1% EACH DAY with Daylight Saving Time.

Franklin in Paris

Benjamin Franklin proposed Daylight Saving Time as an American delegate in Paris in 1784. The idea didn’t really catch on in the United States until World War I, in an effort to save on artificial lighting costs. The same thing happened during World War II.

After the war, states individually chose whether to observe daylight saving time and when they wanted to begin it during the year. As you can imagine, this just caused a lot of confusion, especially for travelers and those of us in the news business.

The Uniform Time Act of 1966 provided the basic framework for alternating between Daylight Saving Time and standard time, which we now observe in the United States. But Congress can’t seem to resist tinkering with it.

For example, in 1973 Daylight Saving Time was observed all year, instead of just the spring and summer. Again in 1986, Congress declared that DST would begin at 2 AM on the first Sunday in April and end at 2 AM on the last Sunday in October.

In 2007, Congress voted to switch the end of daylight saving time to the first Sunday in November to offer trick-or-treaters more daylight time to venture into the streets, even though most children wait until after dark to go out anyway.

While most states observe the spring forward / fall back switch in time, Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands and Arizona do not change the clock.

However, the Navajo Nation in Arizona does participate in daylight saving time and will roll the clock back Sunday. The Hopi Reservation, entirely surrounded by the Navajo Nation, does not observe daylight saving time, creating a “doughnut hole” in time in the middle of Arizona.

When’s the next time change? Fall back Sunday, November 2, 2014.

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Radiation from our Sun

This is the solar flair on the earth’s sun close up.

This labeled image taken by SDO's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager shows the location of two active regions on the sun, labeled AR1944 and AR1943, which straddle a giant sunspot complex. A Jan. 7, 2014, X1.2-class flare emanated from an area closer to AR1

Natural phenomenon and radiation is fascinating to me – we know the moon controls the tides of the ocean and affects many things. Couldn’t a solar flare cause different things to happen to humans? Here is the news on it.

A massive solar flare erupted from the sun on Tuesday (Jan. 7), rising up from what appears to be one of the largest sunspot groups seen on the star’s surface in a decade, NASA officials say.

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured a video of the huge solar flare as it developed, showing it as an intense burst of radiation from a colossal sunspot region known as AR1944. The sunspot group — which is currently in the middle of the sun as viewed from Earth — is “one of the largest sunspots seen in the last 10 years,” NASA officials wrote in a statement. It is as wide as seven Earths, they added.

The 28 team will keep you included on all things going on with mother earth.

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